Location£ºCaissa&Besseiche > News > Insight Within Details¡ª¡ªHao Liang
Caissa&Besseiche Official Microblog
News

Insight Within Details¡ª¡ªHao Liang

By Sotheby's Contemporary asian art

 

Traditional Chinese Culture underwent radical transformations in the 20th century, and so did ink painting,which is considered one of its privileged artistic mediums. In the 1980s,confronted by Western influences, traditional culture had to search for reasons that would correspond to the times, and through this ignited many debates. During the¡¯85 New Wave

,Li Xiaoshan published an essay entitled ¡°My Views on Contemporary Chinese Painting,¡±in which he articulated ink painting¡¯s identity crisis and future challenges. In the 80s and 90s , a group of artists emerged under the banner of ¡°Experimental Ink¡±and explored new expressive possibilities for this traditional medium. But for some artists, especially the younger generations, medium specificity is not the key to artistic creation; instead they chose to transcend the inherited understanding of ¡°Chinese Painting¡±, and located an interface between ink and contemporary art. Although contemporary art and literati painting are two sides of the same coin in terms of their expressive means, creating new vistas for both Chinese painting and contemporary art with their highly refined techniques. As Jiang Ji¡¯an, one of the artists,has said.¡±an open mind is the most important. One must be open to tradition and to the future as well. Only then can gongbi painting remain viable and develop in new directions.¡±

 

 

Hao Liang

 

Borin in 1983, Hao Liang, Like Peng Wei, reveres traditional Chinese ink painting, and is grounded in the refined and luxurious sensibilities of gongbi. His subjects, however, are intimately connected to contemporary life, He graduated with a Master degree in Chinese painting from the Sichuan Academy of Fine Arts in 2009, having studied with the prominent artist Xu Lei. The Song Dynasty was a high point in Chinese painting, when the literati tradition arose and academic court tradition-characterised by careful compositions and detailed, refined brushwork-also flourished. Emperor Huizong¡¯s gongbi bird-and-flower paintings are among the best examples of the latter. Influenced by Song court paintings, Hao Liang seeks the same attention to detail and archaic palette for his own works, but complements them with a mastery of glue-based paints as well as inspiration from Persian painting and Western Renaissance art. In his norable oeuvre,fantastical subjects and breath-taking techniques transport the viewer into historical China and other imaginative worlds.

  

Hao Liang£¨b.1983£©
Standing Alone in the Cold Woods

ink on silk

executed in 2011,framed

 

Standing Alone in the cold woods (Lot 938) comes from Hao Liang¡¯s Searching the Mountains and Hell Transformation Tableaux series, which are inspired by the Tang painter Wu Daozi. Taking cue from Wu Daozi¡¯s mystical aesthetics, Hao meditates on death with every touch of his brush. A man wearing a mask and robes stands alone in the snow next to a barren tree, and a skeleton underneath. Surrounded by symbols of death and looking askance, the man seems to be reflecting on his fleetings life and warn the viewer of the transience of  all earthly pleasures and beauties. Hao does not include any motifs explicitly connected to contemporary society, but his intellectual preoccupation is with timeless issues of existence itself. Skeletons have frequently appeared in his works in recent years, reflecting not only the influence of  Renaissance anatomy but also of traditional Chinese paintings, such as the skeleton¡¯s illusionary Performance by Southern Song- dynasty court painter Li Song. The latter work , in which a skeleton beguiles an infant with a skeletal puppet, shares with Hao¡¯s Standing Alone in the Cold Woods  the theme of the illusoriness of life. Technically, Hao Liang at once draws from and attempts to surpass traditional gongbi by simultaneously capturing spirit and capturing form. As seen in his virtuosic rendition of the man¡¯s translucent robes.